Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Book Review - A Butterfly Called Hope


A Butterfly Called Hope

By: Mary Alice Monroe
Publisher: Sylvan Dell Publishing
Publication Date: September 10, 2013
ISBN: 978-1607188568
Reviewed by: Deb Fowler
Review Date: September 2013

Butterflies flitted quietly in her mother’s garden, hiding in and around the colorful flowers. If you look closely you can find a monarch, a cloudless sulphur, a gulf fritillary, and a black swallowtail. The little girl spotted a “bright yellow and black bug starring” at her from the top of a milkweed leaf. Her brow furrowed as she watched him eat. She called to her mother, “Mommy, come quick! What is it? Will it bite? Or sting me? Will it make me sick?” No, it was a very special caterpillar that would one day be a “beautiful butterfly.” How could that happen and just what kind of butterfly would it become?

There was one person who could answer their questions and that person was Nana Butterfly. They put the little caterpillar in a jar and brought it to her shop. Nana knew at once that it was a monarch butterfly and wanted to take care of it. The little girl wanted to do that herself and they took it back home. They carefully set up an aquarium to take care of the monarch caterpillar. What would happen as it grew and what special name would they give to it when it emerged from its chrysalis?

This is a fascinating tale of the life cycle stages of a monarch butterfly. Of course this is also the special story of what the little girl decided to name her monarch when it was time to set it free. The entire story is accompanied by photographs that relate the life cycle of the monarch. The centerfold has eight amazing pictures that show the new monarch emerging from its chrysalis. Newly independent readers can tackle this book with some assistance. The text is large and bold and is generously illustrated with full-color photographs. In the back of the book are additional activities, including downloadable instructional materials on the publisher’s website. This would be an excellent read and discuss book in the homeschool or classroom setting.

Quill says: If you are doing a module on life cycles in the classroom, this is an excellent book to consider!