Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Book Review - Goldie Takes a Stand


Goldie Takes a Stand: Golda Meir’s First Crusade (Kar-Ben Favorites)

By: Barbara Krasner
Illustrated by: Keley Garrity-Riley
Publisher: Kar-Ben Publishing
Publication Date: August 2014
ISBN: 978-1467712019
Reviewed by: Deb Fowler
Review Date: December 2014

Goldie Mabowehz was a nine-year-old girl who was the president of the “American Young Sisters Society.” Of course being self-appointed worked very well for Goldie. Very well indeed and all the other girls clustered around her would probably agree, including her little sister Clara and her best friend Regina. There were problems to be solved and Goldie was just the girl to get things done. The problem was textbooks. “The kids in our school didn’t have enough money to buy them,” she explained to the Sisters.

Many of the kids like Hymie had tattered books and that annoying Jennie leaned over her desk to peek at Frieda’s. Goldie figured out the math and if all the members could bring in a whole “three cents a week,” that would do it. Now that was enough to buy either a loaf of bread or a quart of milk so that was a lot! Goldie was going to work in Mama’s store to get her share and would charge everyone a little extra. Mrs. Garfinkel was not very happy when Goldie asked extra for those eggs. Stomp, stomp! Out the door she went. Not a penny more from her.

Things weren’t looking up for the American Young Sisters Society because no one managed to raise that three cents. Goldie put her pointer finger to her chin and began to think. “We’ll hold a public meeting, a fundraising gala,” she told the girls, “and collect from everyone at one time.” They began to make posters, Frieda was going to do the invitations, and Lillian would create a “list of important people.” Sarah was wondering just where the big event could be held. Goldie was a big thinker, but could she think big enough to get those textbooks?

This is a charming story about Goldie that will delight young readers. Of course Goldie Mabowehz is none other than Golda Meir. Even as a young girl she had great leadership qualities. This fictionalized tale, based on real events, had a great flow and will draw in even the most reluctant readers. Goldie’s generosity and empathy toward others will resonate with the young reader. The artwork, a mix of gouache and collage, had a nice period feel. In the back of the book is a brief vignette about Goldie’s life, including pictures, a bibliography, and additional recommended websites to explore.

Quill says: This is a wonderful look at young Goldie (Golda Meir), a girl who knew how to get things done!