Sunday, April 6, 2014

Books In For Review

Here's a quick look at some of the books that have just come in for review.  Check them out and then stop by again in a few weeks to read the reviews!



How to Survive the Worst That Can Happen: A Parent's Step by Step Guide to Healing After the Loss of a Child by Sandy Peckinpah Sandy Peckinpah's sixteen-year old son woke up with a fever and was dead the next morning of bacterial meningitis... her life changed forever. She found herself in the depths of unimaginable despair. Then, someone gave her a journal, and writing opened her journey of self-discovery in learning how to live life without her beautiful child. Words illuminated her path of discovery and she began to document the things that helped her, and others like her, to find resilience. This is a practical, inspirational guide to coping with the many facets of bereavement; learning how to talk about your loss, the aftermath of sorrow, handling fear and anger, helping your living children adjust, strengthening your marriage, experiencing miracles, and the promise that you will regain a quality of life where you'll feel joy once again. If you've lost a child or know someone who has, Sandy's story is one you'll relate to and find comfort in knowing you're not alone.  

The Artist and the King by Julie Fortenberry When a bad-tempered King punishes a little artist, he meets his match. For Daphne, the artist, turns her punishment, a dunce cap, into a fashionable and regal hat. Now every villager wants to wear one of Daphne's creations. How could she have known that her hat-making would undermine the King's authority? Then again, maybe Daphne's caring, creative spirit is just what the kingdom--and the King--has needed all along.  

Panthers Play for Keeps: A Pru Marlowe Pet Mystery by Clea Simon When Pru Marlowe takes a dog for a walk, she doesn’t expect to find a body. But Spot, a service dog in training, has too good a nose not to lead her to the remains of the beautiful young woman, and despite her own best instincts, Pru can’t avoid getting involved. The young woman seems to have been mauled by a wild cat – and Pru knows there have been no pumas in the Berkshire woods for years. And while Wallis, Pru's curmudgeonly tabby, seems fixated on the idea of a killer cat, Spot has been sending strange signals to Pru’s own heightened senses, suggesting that the violent death was something more than a tragic accident. As motives multiply, a cougar of a different sort sets her eyes on Pru’s sometime lover, and another woman disappears. With panther panic growing, Pru may have to put aside her own issues – and her own ideas of domesticity – to solve a savage mystery.

A Farm Dies Once a Year by Arlo Crawford The summer he was thirty-one, Arlo Crawford returned home for the summer harvest at New Morning Farm—seventy-five acres tucked in a hollow in south-central Pennsylvania where his parents had been growing organic vegetables for almost forty years. Like many summers before, Arlo returned to the family farm's familiar rhythms—rise, eat, bend, pick, sort, sweat, sleep. But this time he was also there to change his direction, like his father years ago. In the 1970s, well before the explosion of the farm-to-table and slow food movement, Arlo's father, Jim, left behind law school and Vietnam, and decided to give farming a try. Arlo's return also prompts a reexamination of a past tragedy: the murder of a neighboring farmer twenty years before. A chronicle of one full season on a farm, with all its small triumphs and inevitable setbacks, A Farm Dies Once a Year is a meditation on work—the true nature of it, and on taking pride in it—and a son's reckoning with a father's legacy. Above all, it is a striking portrait of how one man builds, sows, and harvests his way into a new understanding of the risks necessary to a life well-lived.